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Being Diagnosed with Celiac Disease Was the Luckiest Day of My Life

I recently read a fantastic article by Danna Korn on Celiac.com titled, Diagnosed with celiac disease? How lucky you are! I am in total agreement with this line of thought and have been preaching this for many years to people. Danna hit just about every point that I like to make and really makes a great case for the benefits of a celiac disease diagnosis.

As she states, people complain about the high cost of gluten-free food — yes, it can be expensive, but compare it to the skyrocketing cost of pharmaceutical medicine and there really is no comparison. Think about how many times you were misdiagnosed with something else. I know I was tested for everything from AIDS to Hepatitis to Chron’s disease. Remember how bad you felt and how much better you started to feel after a relatively short time on the gluten-free diet. As she says, you’ve been given the key to better health — all with a diet modification. This is as lucky as lucky gets. I know many people with horrible illnesses that require a stockpile of medication every month, all of which have horrible side effects and issues with toxicity. I will go with a diet alteration any day.

If this is the type of food that I’m limited to eating — I think I’ll be OK :)

So the next time you find yourself excessively worrying about the cost of gluten-free food, just remind yourself of how much worse it could be. There are some incredible options available to us now, options that were unheard of as recently as just a few years ago. To be a celiac in 2010 is really a wonderful thing. You’re aware of what you are eating and you’re very aware of what food can do to your body. This really does make us lucky.

About Chris Armstrong

I created the Celiac Handbook website in 2004. It has evolved into a portal for new (and old) ideas related to healthy and sustainable gluten-free living and avoiding the usual pitfalls of the gluten-free junk food market.

Disclaimer

This article is for informational purposes only, and is educational in nature. Statements made here have not been evaluated by the FDA. This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Please discuss with your own, qualified health care provider before adding in supplements or making any changes in your diet.

  • http://www.homecafepcs.com Alison Chapman

    I so agree with everything you said! I don’t have an official diagnosis of Celiac disease or a gluten intolerance. I discovered my gluten intolerance by going gluten free and realizing how many physical ailments went away. How lucky that I don’t have to take medications! I feel better than good, I feel amazing! I’m eating better than I ever have in my life, and I wouldn’t trade my gluten intolerance for anything.